Webinar: Startup Licensing 101 – The License, Part 1

For many entrepreneurs, licensing from a university may be a new experience. This series of webinars provides information that will be helpful for academic entrepreneurs contemplating their first (or perhaps subsequent) license from an academic institution. Presented by an attorney who represents many academic startups, including their investors, along with two academic technology transfer veterans, these webinars bring views from both sides of the table and best practices for a fruitful and efficient negotiation.

Webinar: Life Science Term Sheets

Over the past year, tech transfer directors from Columbia, Duke, JHU, Penn, MIT, Stanford, and Yale worked with life science VCs from 5AM, Atlas, Polaris, OUP, RA Capital, and Venrock to create a common set of principles for university startup deal negotiations. These principles were captured in two documents: “Recommendations for Term Sheet Structuring”, covering equity, royalties, milestones, sublicensing, know-how royalties, diligence, and other recommendations for creating win-win outcomes; and “Recommendations for Process Improvements”, with recommendations for structuring the negotiation process itself to avoid unnecessary friction, gain buy-in early, and avoid overly long and painful negotiations.

Webinar: Angel & Accelerator Funding for University Startups

Join OUP for a webinar discussing models, structures, and best practices in raising pre-seed and seed funding for university startup companies from angels and accelerators. Our panel of experts will review their own models, which are distinct from each other in both the areas in which they invest as well as the additional value they provide. Other topics covered will include raising pre-seed and seed amounts, timing and structures for the raises, how to meet with these types of investors, the roles potentially played by these investors with the startups, and much more.

Webinar: Life Science Corporate Venture Capital

Corporate VCs have played a crucial role in financing life sciences companies for decades, but have you ever wondered what, if anything, makes them different from institutional venture capital funds? Join us for this webinar as we talk to a panel of investors at industry-leading CVC funds to learn more about their strategies, investment criteria, and how they measure success.

Webinar: Stock Purchase Agreements in University Equity Licenses

When a university licenses technology to a startup, a grant of equity is a likely consideration offered by the licensee. To receive the equity, the university will review and negotiate a Stock Purchase Agreement – a legal agreement made between the corporation (startup) and the university that governs the transfer and sale of the corporation’s stock to the university and often related financial terms, which can impact the university’s potential returns.

Webinar: Small Molecule vs Antibody Development Challenges

Therapeutics remain the primary focus for life science venture investments. As we all know, pre-clinical development of therapeutics is complicated, time consuming, and capital intensive. In the early stages of development, multiple aspects of a therapeutic product need to be optimized to enhance its drug-like properties. However, given the limited time and resources in the academic setting, what aspects of development should inventors focus on? Before diving into drug development, inventors should ask themselves: What is feasible in an academic setting? What is valued more by the investors? Should it be performed in-house or be out-sourced? How much would it cost?

Webinar: Venture Capital & University Startup Financial Trends of 2018

We’re almost halfway through 2018, which means it is once again time for OUP’s annual financing trends webinar. Which sectors have had the greatest investment and which are facing funding challenges? How do these trends apply to advancing academic technologies? What does the beginning of 2018 imply for the rest of the year and what lies over the horizon?

Webinar: University In House Therapeutics Development

Recently, several universities and research institutions have set up internally driven and funded therapeutics development programs providing faculty the opportunity to push high impact translational research projects further than has been typically seen within an academic setting. These programs can oversee all stages of therapeutic discovery and development, from lab-based discovery to clinical trials. Why did these institutions decide to start these programs? How are these programs administered? What multi-disciplinary talent is needed and where did each institution find it? And perhaps most importantly, how much do these programs cost and who pays the bill?